• Digital natives aren’t as tech-savvy as they may think they are — at least, not according to their employers. American millennials (those between the ages of 16 and 34) may be the first generation that grew up with computers and Internet access, but all that time spent glued to a small screen hasn’t translated to technology competence. While they spend an average of 35 hours every week on digital media, nearly six out of 10 millennials can’t do basic tasks such as sorting, searching for and emailing data from a spreadsheet.

    tags: research millennials low technology skills campus digital divide

    •  
      • This is actually not much of a surprise to many of us.  The myth of the digital native being actually adept at personal computing is blown apart.
    • Digital natives aren’t as tech-savvy as they may think they are — at least, not according to their employers. American millennials (those between the ages of 16 and 34) may be the first generation that grew up with computers and Internet access, but all that time spent glued to a small screen hasn’t translated to technology competence. While they spend an average of 35 hours every week on digital media, nearly six out of 10 millennials can’t do basic tasks such as sorting, searching for and emailing data from a spreadsheet.

    • AIR specifically examined results of "Problem Solving in Technology Rich Environments" for 5,000 test-takers in the United States, aged 16 to 64. Those questions assess how well the person can use digital technology, communications tools and networks to get and analyze information, communicate with others and "perform practical tasks."

    • although 91 percent of millennials consider a lack of computer skills irrelevant to their job prospects, employers think otherwise,

    • only 37 percent consider recent college graduates well prepared to stay on top of new technologies.

    • That gap could impair millennial earning power. As the report noted, a person ranked at the lowest skill level earns nearly 40 percent less on average ($2,920 per month) than a person at the highest level ($6,622), even when other characteristics that affect earnings, such as race, gender or skills in math and literacy, are held constant.

    • CEO Linda Rosen. "If we continue to leave young people to their own devices — quite literally — their low skills will become a dead weight on individual opportunity and American productivity."

      • Among the recommendations offered in the new report:

           

        • To use technology to solve real-world challenges;
        •  

        • To share lessons from business;
        •  

        • To serve underserved populations in STEM fields, including women and people of color; and
        •  

        • To teach the teachers.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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